CHAPTER 266

STATE OF DELAWARE

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, the Commanding General, Eastern Defense Command, has established the following rules and regulations for the control of artificial lighting within the zone hereinafter defined, effective immediately, from one hour after sundown each night until sunrise the following morning, for the duration of the war or until such time as these orders may be rescinded or amended.

1. The term "coast line" as used hereinafter for the Second Corps Area is declared to mean the coast line beginning at Rocky Point, Long Island; thence easterly and around the southern shore line of Long Island to Fort Hamilton; thence to Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island; thence along the southern shore of Staten Island to the mouth of the Raritan River; thence along the northern and eastern shore of New Jersey to Cape May; thence north and westward along the shore line of New Jersey to Ben Davis point; thence southwest to Deep Water Point, Delaware; thence southward along the coast line of Delaware to the Delaware-Maryland State boundary.

2. These regulations apply to a zone to include specifically within each state, the counties or portions thereof as set forth below :

a. In the State of New York :

b. In the State of New Jersey:

c. In the State of Delaware, the Counties of Kent and Sussex.

3. These regulations do not apply to official maritime or aerial navigation lights.

4. All lights normally visible from the sea shall be dimmed or shaded in such a manner that they will not be visible under any conditions at a distance of more than one mile from the shore. If they cannot be so dimmed or shaded, they shall be extinguished.

5. All exterior lights used for illumination or guidance of traffic (such as street lights) and all lights used for security measures or necessary outdoor protection, outdoor manufacture, storage or shipping of war materials (such as floodlights or artificial illumination in freight yards, docks or shipyards), shall be reduced in volume, number or wattage to a minimum consistent with their purpose and shaded so as to prevent their direct rays shining at an angle above the horizontal.

6. All other exterior lights used for illumination of open areas, such as parking lots, playgrounds, places of amusement or entertainment, sidewalk cafes, marquees, open-air gardens or terraces, etc., must be so shaded as to prevent their lights shining at an angle above the horizontal and the combined lighting of such areas may not exceed the average of one-quarter watt per square foot, and no individual light used for such purposes shall be in excess of one hundred watts at the rated voltage.

7. All lights within display windows, shop windows, open lobbies and other places of business shall be so shaded by opaque material as to prevent their direct rays being visible from any point on the exterior of the window or opening and the total lighting of such display windows shall not exceed the average of one-half watt per square foot of vertical window or opening. Where the lights of the interior of such shops, stores or other places of business are normally visible from the exterior thereof, they shall be so shaded by opaque material as to prevent the direct rays being visible from any point outside of the building. Lights reflected outward by mirrors or other polished surfaces are subject to these provisions. Where the display window or opening is not protected from the main portion of the store, shop or place of business by a protective back drop or partition, the wattage for lighting of the interior of such store, shop or place of business shall not exceed the average of one-quarter watt per square foot of floor space.

8. All other windows, openings and skylights that open either on the street or courtyard or roof, shall be so screened or shaded as to prevent direct rays of light escaping therefrom. In lieu of complete screening or shading of such windows, the interior lights of the rooms concerned shall be individually shaded to prevent the shining or reflection of lights out of such windows.

* 9. All exterior advertising signs illuminated by floodlights,

incandescent bulbs, neon, fluorescent, or other lighting, shall be extinguished.

10. Automobiles, parked or moving, where their headlights would normally be visible from seaward, shall extinguish their bright lights. If in motion, they shall proceed with due caution using only parking lights.

U. Bonfires, brush fires, burning fields, etc., specifically come under the same regulations concerning other lighting. Where brush, rubbish, fields, etc. are burned, it shall be so arranged that these fires will be extinguished completely by one hour after sundown.

12. Pursuant to authority contained in Paragraph 6 Public Proclamation No. 1, Headquarters Eastern Defense Command, dated May 16, 1942, the agencies designated to enforce the provisions of those regulations are as follows:

a. State and/or local authorities are charged with the enforcement of such of these regulations as pertain to private and public lighting (except military establishments and war plants operating under War Department supervision).

b. The military authorities are charged with the enforcement of such of these regulations as pertain to military establishments and war plants operating under the supervision of the War Department.

EARLE D. WILLEY, Secretary of State.

13. These regulations supersede all previous regulations concerning the control of artificial lighting issued by this Headquarters.

T. A. TERRY

Major General, U. S. Army, Commanding

June 1, 1942

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Walter W. Bacon, Governor of the State of Delaware, in compliance with the request of the Commanding General, issue this Proclamation, calling the above rules and regulations to the attention of the people of Delaware and urge their complete cooperation in carrying the provisions of this executive order into effect.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the State of Delaware to be hereunto affixed, at Dover, this fifth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand

(GREAT SEAL) nine hundred and forty-two, and of the Independence of the United States. of America, the one hundred and sixty-sixth.

By the Governor:

WALTER W. BACON