CHAPTER 210 - SETTLEMENT OF PERSONAL ESTATES RELATIVE TO EXECUTION AND RECORDING OF RELEASES AND ACQUITTANCES TO EXECUTORS AND ADMINISTRATORS.

AN ACT IN RELATION TO THE EXECUTION AND RECORDING OF RELEASES AND ACQUITTANCES TO EXECUTORS AND ADMINISTRATORS; RECORD EVIDENCE; BEING AN AMENDMENT TO CHAPTER 98 OF THE REVISED CODE OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE 1935.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Delaware in General Assembly met:

Section 1. That Section 74 of Chapter 98 of the Revised Code of Delaware (1935), being Section 3872 of said Code, be and the same is hereby amended by striking out and repealing all of 3872 Section 74 of said Chapter 98 as contained in the Revised Code of Delaware (1935) and inserting in lieu thereof the following new section to be known and styled as 3872. Section 74:

3872. Section 74. Execution and Recording of Releases and Acquittances to Executors and Administrators; Record Evidence: Any release acquittance, or receipt, being executed under hand and seal by any legatee, next of kin, or interested person, of full age, to an executor or administrator, for any property or sum of money due by virtue of a will, or upon a testamentary or administration account passed before the Register, and acknowledged before the Chancellor, or any Judge, Register of Wills, Justice of the Peace, Notary Public of any State or Territory of the United States, or of the District of Columbia, or before any Consul General, Consul, Vice-Consul, consular agent or commercial agent of the United States duly appointed in any foreign country, and certified under the hand of such officer and the seal of his office, shall upon being delivered to the Register of Wills in whose office such will or account is recorded or filed, be by him recorded in a book for that purpose, which shall have direct and reversed alphabetical indices; and such record or a duly certified copy thereof under the hand and official seal of such Register of Wills shall be competent evidence in all cases.

Approved April 1, 1941.